Walmart Boosts Rewards Program for Store Credit Card and MoneyCard

April 1, 2016, Written By Bill Hardekopf

Starting today, Walmart will be offering new rewards for Walmart Credit Card and Walmart MoneyCard users. The revamped 3-2-1 Cash Back program is designed to simplify the rewards system, and help consumers save more money on their purchases.

Under the new rewards structure, cardholders will be able to earn:

  • 3% cash back for orders made through Walmart.com, including Site to Store transactions (where the customer picks up the order at the store instead of having it shipped to his or her home)
  • 2% cash back for fuel purchases at Murphy USA and other Walmart gas stations
  • 1% cash back on purchases made everywhere Walmart credit cards are accepted, including those completed at Walmart stores (MoneyCard customers will only earn cash back at Walmart stores)

The rewards apply to purchase made in the United States and Puerto Rico. Existing cardholders will automatically be enrolled in the 3-2-1 Save program without the need for a new card. All of the existing points on their accounts will remain and can be used at any time.

Walmart now offers a special financing program through its credit cards for in-store purchases or $150 or more, and qualifying new cardholders can get 10% off their Walmart.com transactions on the first day.

If you are not currently a Walmart credit card or MoneyCard customer, any card you qualify for will now carry the new rewards program. You can apply for the credit card online or in stores, and you can pick up a reloadable MoneyCard for $1 at 4,500 Walmart locations throughout the country.



The information contained within this article was accurate as of April 1, 2016. For up-to-date
information on any of the terms, cards or offers mentioned above, visit the issuer's website.


About Bill Hardekopf

Bill Hardekopf is the CEO of LowCards.com and covers the credit card industry from all perspectives. Bill has been involved with personal finance for over 15 years. He is a frequent contributor to Forbes, The Street and The Christian Science Monitor.
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