Mastercard Will Offer Contactless Payments on Fitbit Ionic

August 28, 2017, Written By Bill Hardekopf

Mastercard announced today it will bring contactless payments to the Fitbit Ionic, Fitbit’s first smartwatch. Fitbit Ionic users will be able to add their eligible cards to their smartwatch and pay by tapping their devices near contactless terminals.

Contactless payments are more secure, as users pay with a unique token instead of their payment card number. If someone attempted to use the token on a different device, it would not work, which means tokens are a safer way to process payments than debit or credit cards. They are also more convenient than using cash.

“Consumers today are expecting technology to help them accomplish life’s daily tasks with as few steps or clicks as possible,” said Kiki Del Valle, senior vice president of Commerce for Every Device at Mastercard. “By adding payment capabilities to a Fitbit device, Mastercard cardholders who are already on-the-go can easily buy what they need without having to bring their wallet with them.”

“We’re focused on delivering the features that add that right level of utility to our users, so they can focus on reaching their health and fitness goals. Fitbit Pay lets you make payments on the go directly from your wrist with Fitbit Ionic, adding convenience to your life and the ability to leave your smartphone and wallet at home,” said Jon Oakes, vice president of Product Management at Fitbit. “We’re delighted to work with Mastercard to deliver the freedom of contactless payments to our users.”

The Fitbit Ionic is available for pre-order today and will begin shipping in October. Initially, the payment function will be available in the United States only, but it will expand to other markets in the future.



The information contained within this article was accurate as of August 28, 2017. For up-to-date
information on any of the terms, cards or offers mentioned above, visit the issuer's website.


About Bill Hardekopf

Bill Hardekopf is the CEO of LowCards.com and covers the credit card industry from all perspectives. Bill has been involved with personal finance for over 15 years. He is a frequent contributor to Forbes, The Street and The Christian Science Monitor.
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