Who Killed the Cash Register?

July 10, 2013, Written By Justin Hefner

PayPal announced its new Cash for Registers program last month, which encourages merchants to switch from cash registers to PayPal-powered POS systems. With their latest commercial, the company is now asking “Who killed the cash registers?” in a funny Law & Order style spoof.

Merchants who switch to PayPal products will not have to pay any credit card fees or PayPal fees for the remainder of 2013, which could encourage the development of many new users. The program utilizes PayPal Here technology, which can also be found in the small dongle that merchants can hook to their smart phones. Merchants insert the dongle into a tablet and use that to process payments, calculate funds, or email or text receipts. The only catch is that the money goes into a PayPal account before being accessible at the bank.

Cash for Registers is just one of many programs currently aiming to eliminate standard registers for good. While many businesses remain resistant to the change, there are some that are converting their efforts to PayPal, Square and other similar mobile processors. The software needed to run these programs is completely free to try. All you have to do is pay per transaction that is processed.

Surprisingly, PayPal is not responsible for much of the hardware that goes into its program. David Marcus, president of PayPal, noted this in a blog post: “At PayPal we’ve spent a long time listening to small businesses and retailers of all sizes, and we came to the conclusion that no one company can cater to the needs of all industries. That’s why we have handpicked select partners that are each best-in-class in their respective categories.”

This should be comforting for future users who want to get only the best for their businesses.



The information contained within this article was accurate as of July 10, 2013. For up-to-date
information on any of the terms, cards or offers mentioned above, visit the issuer's website.


About Justin Hefner

Justin Hefner is in the education field and has written about a number of financial issues. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Texas Tech University and a Masters in Education from Texas State University.
View all posts by Justin Hefner