Cyberattacks Up 40% on Android Devices

September 12, 2017, Written By Bill Hardekopf

With the growth of mobile wallets in America, cyberattacks on mobile devices are more worrisome than ever. Apple Pay, Samsung Pay, Android Pay and other wallets have multiple security layers to protect credit card and debit card information, but hackers are getting creative in the way they collect and store data.

New research from Avast shows a 40% increase in cyberattacks on Android phones and tablets compared to year-ago levels, illustrating the importance of mobile device security. Between the second quarter of 2016 and the second quarter of 2017, Android security threats increased from 1.2 million attacks per month to 1.7 million.

The more variations of a virus, the better its chances are of tapping into a mobile device. Avast found an average of 788 variations per month this past quarter, up 22.2% from the year before.

Rooters are the most common types of mobile attacks on Android devices, representing 22.8%. Hackers are able to gain root access to a smartphone to steal information. Downloaders represented 22.7% of the threats. These are used to trick people into downloading malicious apps. Those apps can then be used to collect information from the phone.

Most phones and tablets come with their own built-in security features, but you can download or purchase additional security programs to protect your information. As always, keep an eye on your financial accounts and notify your financial institution about any unauthorized transactions.



The information contained within this article was accurate as of September 12, 2017. For up-to-date
information on any of the terms, cards or offers mentioned above, visit the issuer's website.


About Bill Hardekopf

Bill Hardekopf is the CEO of LowCards.com and covers the credit card industry from all perspectives. Bill has been involved with personal finance for over 15 years. He is a frequent contributor to Forbes, The Street and The Christian Science Monitor.
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