Credit Card Fraud a Top Concern for Women Traveling Alone

May 16, 2018, Written By Lynn Oldshue

A new study from AIG Travel shows women are highly concerned about safety when traveling alone. Nearly half of respondents said they feel less safe while traveling now than they did five years ago, and 63% said they think about safety the entire time they are traveling.

Pick-pocketing was the biggest cause of concern, with 93% of women citing purse snatching as a primary safety risk on a trip. That was followed by credit card fraud at 86% and identity theft at 63%.

Credit card fraud and ID theft aren’t just concerns for women though. A separate study from Visa revealed payment card fraud was the second highest source of stress for global travelers, trailing slightly behind cash theft. Travelers also said card-related merchant fees, ATM fees and credit card disputes were high stressors.

Consumers can take a number of steps to ease the financial worries when planning for a trip:

  • Notify your credit card provider of your upcoming travels. This lowers the risk of having your card declined for suspicious activity.
  • Verify your card will work in your destination. Will you have access to free ATMs? If not, what fee will your credit card company charge for balance inquiries and withdrawals? The ATM may also charge a fee, so you will need to monitor your costs.
  • Know how to check your balance while traveling. You may not have access to the mobile app you typically use, so prepare to check by phone, by computer, or at an ATM.
  • Store your card and money in a thin pouch under your shirt. You can find these at most stores where luggage is sold. The pouch is discrete, and is difficult for pick-pocketers to access.
  • Do not rely solely on one card for your travel expenses. Keep some local currency on hand in case your card is lost, stolen, or locked for fraud, and consider bringing a second card for emergency purchases.


The information contained within this article was accurate as of May 16, 2018. For up-to-date
information on any of the terms, cards or offers mentioned above, visit the issuer's website.


About Lynn Oldshue

Lynn Oldshue has written personal finance stories for LowCards.com for twelve years. She majored in public relations at Mississippi State University.
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