Better Digital Banking Means Higher Expectations for In-Person Banking

August 22, 2018, Written By John H. Oldshue
Better Digital Banking Means Higher Expectations for In-Person Banking

As technology improves, so does the world of digital banking. Consumers have come to expect a simple, easy-to-use experience from their digital banking services. A new survey from Computer Services, Inc. shows 86% of consumers are satisfied with their financial institution’s digital banking services, but they have also come to expect more from in-person banking.

According to the 2018 Consumer Poll, 85% of consumers expect to have all their banking needs met through one banker. Eighty-three percent of bank customers want their financial institutions to advise them on how to reach their financial goals. This shows consumers expect knowledgeable bank employees who can assess their financial needs and answer their questions.

With regards to digital banking, 86% of customers expect a seamless experience across all platforms. This applies to the appearance of the app/website, as well as the ability to pause transactions on one device and complete them on another. For instance, if a consumer is filling out a loan application on their phone, they expect to save changes and complete the application on their tablet or computer.

Perhaps the most surprising finding is that 49% of consumers believe peer-to-peer payment providers, such as Venmo and Zelle, are more secure than credit or debit cards. While having a middleman for transactions seems like a secure option, Venmo has recently come under fire for making transactions public by default.



The information contained within this article was accurate as of August 22, 2018. For up-to-date
information on any of the terms, cards or offers mentioned above, visit the issuer's website.


About John H. Oldshue

john-oldshue
John Oldshue is the creator of LowCards.com. He worked for over 15 years in television and won an Emmy award for his reporting. He covers credit card rate issues for LowCards.com.
View all posts by John H. Oldshue