Bar Patron Charged Idiot Tax for Leaving Credit Card Behind

December 4, 2013, Written By Natalie Rutledge

Most of us have wanted to charge someone else money for doing something stupid in our presence. A bar in Canada made that thought a reality for one of their patrons.

When a woman in St. John’s, Newfoundland accidentally left her credit card at a local pub, the bartender decided to charge a 25% tip to her card. On the top of her receipt, he labeled the charge as an “idiot tax“, which enraged the cardholder and caused her to investigate the situation.

Katie Jackson, the cardholder, said she spoke with a friend who was also charged a 25% idiot tax.

“I can understand being charged a 15% tip,” said Jackson.

The bar said the following in an email as a response to the event:

It is our policy to close off all credit cards at the end of the night and include an industry standard 15% gratuity or service charge on all cards left behind. If there are any issues with the services provided, we are more than happy to refund without question, there has never been a issue or a complaint up until now.

In the past we have learned that people cancel or suspend credit cards after a night on the town claiming to have forgotten where they have left it.

I throw out hundreds every year. We are unable to be compensated at this point and the consumer would get away with a free night and be issued with a new card.

The next time you go out for drinks, make sure you bring your card back home with you. Better yet, you may want to just bring cash.



The information contained within this article was accurate as of December 4, 2013. For up-to-date
information on any of the terms, cards or offers mentioned above, visit the issuer's website.


About Natalie Rutledge

Natalie Rutledge majored in Communications at Mississippi State University. She was in sales for a number of businesses and spent nine years working as a communications advisor to various entities. Natalie can be contacted directly at natalie@lowcards.com
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