Apple Pay Will Change on the iPhone X

September 13, 2017, Written By John H. Oldshue

Apple introduced a number of new products at its big event yesterday, including Apple TV 4K, Apple Watch Series 3 and iPhone 8 and 8 Plus. Perhaps the most exciting announcement, though, was the introduction of iPhone X.

With the iPhone X, Apple is doing away with the familiar home button to provide an all-screen display and dust- and water-resistant build. Since users will no longer be able to unlock their phone with TouchID, Apple has introduced Face ID, which will enable users to look at their phone to unlock the device, enable Apple Pay and gain access to secure apps.

Face ID uses a TrueDepth camera system with a dot projector, infrared camera and flood illuminator to map a user’s face. It projects more than 30,000 invisible IR dots, which allows the iPhone X to make a mathematical model of a user’s face and also adapt to changes in their appearance. Facial information is stored in a secure enclave and processing is done on-device instead of in the cloud. Apple says these measures will prevent unauthorized users from accessing the iPhone X by spoofing with photos or masks.

What does all of this mean for Apple Pay? For merchants, not much, as existing NFC terminals will still work with the new phones. Users will have a slightly different experience at the register, though. Shoppers will tap a button on the side of iPhone X twice and then look at the phone. This will unlock the device, and then users put the mobile device near the terminal to complete the transaction.

Pre-orders for iPhone X start on October 27, and the device begins shipping on November 3. The base model costs $999.



The information contained within this article was accurate as of September 13, 2017. For up-to-date
information on any of the terms, cards or offers mentioned above, visit the issuer's website.


About John H. Oldshue

John Oldshue is the creator of LowCards.com. He worked for over 15 years in television and won an Emmy award for his reporting. He covers credit card rate issues for LowCards.com.
View all posts by John H. Oldshue