1 in 4 cardholders globally have been victimized by fraud

February 26, 2013, Written By Justin Hefner

One out of four consumers from 17 countries worldwide have been victims of credit, debit or prepaid card fraud, according to a survey conducted by the payments system company ACI Worldwide.

The 2013 Global Card Fraud Survey is based on interviews by ACI Worldwide and Aite Group, a consulting firm for the financial services industry, with more than 5,200 cardholders from 17 countries. Residents of the United States and Mexico reported the highest rate of card fraud, while cardholders from The Netherlands and Sweden reported the lowest incidents of fraud.

Other key findings in the survey:

  • Financial institutions are running the risk of losing customers due to fraud, either directly or through a decreased use of their cards.
  • Consumers report they fear identity theft most and would like to be notified immediately by banks of any potential fraud. They would like to be kept informed of the progress of any fraud disputes.
  • While fearing identity theft consumers are also demonstrating continued risky behaviors such as writing down personal identification numbers (PIN), failing to destroy personal documents and sharing credit card data on electronic devices lacking security software.

The survey found a growing rate of so-called “friendly fraud.” That involves a cardholder who does business online who finds unauthorized charges from a site he or she has done business with in the past, or has a card account accessed by a friend or family member who makes charges without permission.

Here are steps you can take to prevent protect your credit or debit card from fraud:

  • Make sure that your PIN, or personal identification number used on card purchases isn’t known by anyone but a spouse or significant other, or someone you trust.
  • Be cautious at ATM machines, ensuring that no one can see you typing in your PIN digits.
  • Only use an ATM you are familiar with so that you can verify it with the bank in case fraud occurs. Sometimes criminals post hidden cameras to capture your personal information or “skimmers” to steal your card data.
  • If you see unauthorized transactions on your account, alert your bank as quickly as possible.


The information contained within this article was accurate as of February 26, 2013. For up-to-date
information on any of the terms, cards or offers mentioned above, visit the issuer's website.


About Justin Hefner

Justin Hefner is in the education field and has written about a number of financial issues. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Texas Tech University and a Masters in Education from Texas State University.
View all posts by Justin Hefner