Russian Hacker Convicted of Stealing 1.7 Million Credit Card Numbers

August 29, 2016, Written By John H. Oldshue
Computer hacker stealing data from a laptop concept for network security, identity theft and computer crime

A Russian hacker has been convicted for stealing 1.7 million credit card numbers and selling them on the black market.

Roman Valerevich Seleznev, who operated as Track2, was convicted in the Western District Court of Washington on 38 counts, including wire fraud, intentional damage to a protected computer, obtaining information from a protected computer, possessing 15 or more unauthorized devices and aggravated identity theft.

According to a press release from the U.S. Department of Justice, Seleznev’s operation, which lasted from 2009 to 2013, mainly involved hacking point-of-sale computers and installing malware to steal credit and debit card information. Most of the businesses he attacked were in Western Washington, and the Broadway Grill was forced into bankruptcy due to his alleged actions. In total, the attacks resulted in losses of more than $169 million for 3,700 financial institutions.

The Department of Justice also reported that, once the 32-year-old Seleznev obtained the credit card information, he sent it to servers he controlled in Russia, Ukraine or McLean, VA. He then bundled the information into groups called “bases” and sold them on “carding” websites.

Seleznev was arrested in 2014, and investigators found more than 1.7 million stolen credit card numbers on his laptop. He will be sentenced in December but is facing additional charges for hacks in Georgia and Nevada.

Since Seleznev’s father, Valery Seleznev, is a member of the Russian Federal Assembly and close to President Vladimir Putin, the case has caused some international tension. Seleznev’s father has gone so far as to suggest his son was arrested as retribution for Russia harboring Edward Snowden.

Seleznev’s attorney said they plan to appeal the verdict. His defense team argues that his computer was tampered with while it was in the custody of the U.S. Secret Service office.



The information contained within this article was accurate as of August 29, 2016. For up-to-date
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