Credit Card Thief Tries to Eat the Evidence

February 12, 2014, Written By Natalie Rutledge
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A hotel receptionist in Manchester, England was recently convicted of selling his customers’ credit card information after a police officer found him trying to eat the evidence.

The officer noticed the man and thought he was trying to swallow drugs. Authorities managed to get half of a piece of paper out that contained a customer’s bank details, and that was enough to take the man in for questioning.

Alain Tchokote later admitted that he had been collecting credit card information at his place of work and selling it to a man in France. He said that he had sold as many as 15 “lots” of credit cards, which included each guest’s credit card number, name, address, expiration date and security code.

Tchokote said that the only reason he went through with the sales is because he needed money. At this time, more than half a dozen victims have been linked to this fraud case, which has resulted in £1,700 in losses to the victims.

Tchokote has been given a 12-month sentence as punishment for the event, plus 150 hours of community service and a two-year suspension.

“We depend on these cards and electronic means of payment so much nowadays,” said Judge Lindsey Kushner QC when sentencing the criminal. “It is crucial that the cards and information they carry are as secure and confidential as possible, because once the details get into the wrong hands, then it means that everybody’s financial stability is threatened.”



The information contained within this article was accurate as of February 12, 2014. For up-to-date
information on any of the terms, cards or offers mentioned above, visit the issuer's website.


About Natalie Rutledge

Natalie Rutledge majored in Communications at Mississippi State University. She was in sales for a number of businesses and spent nine years working as a communications advisor to various entities. Natalie can be contacted directly at [email protected]
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